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JAMS/ACR 2017 Notice of Funding Availability

Posted by CR Ed on Oct 19, 16  

The JAMS Foundation and the Association for Conflict Resolution are accepting applications for the 2017 Funding Cycle for Conflict Resolution Education small grants. 

The 2017 Theme: Conflict Resolution Education for Youth Experiencing Interventions by Juvenile Justice or Social Service Agencies

To access the documents for additional details, click here.  Interested organizations or individuals are required to submit a 1-3 page Initial Project Idea description to ACR no later than 11:59 PM local time of the organization’s legal/main location, Thursday, December 1, 2016 to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).  For questions, contact the ACR Office at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 202.780.5999.

Notice of Funding Availability - ACR/JAMS 2016 funding cycle supporting CRE

Posted by CR Ed on Mar 11, 16  

Notification of Funding Availability (NOFA)

Request for Initial Proposal Ideas ACR JAMS Foundation Partnership Regular Year One – 2016

The Association for Conflict Resolution (ACR) is pleased to announce this Notification of Funding Availability (NOFA)  and request for initial proposal ideas for the 2016 funding cycle of the ACR/JAMS partnership in supporting Conflict Resolution Education.  The mission of the ACR/JAMS partnership is summarized below.

Mission: The population to be served by the funding streams will be (1) youth in preK-12 age range and/or (2) adults working with these youth populations in ways that directly transfer CRE skills for adults to the youth populations. Funding Contexts: The contexts for projects may be a variety of contexts including community, schools, alternative education (online education, charter schools, after school programs), government (juvenile justice facilities, courts) and NGO settings. While some proposals may be able to secure and guarantee access to or cooperation from traditional K-12 school districts/schools, we are excited by opportunity to support possible funding of CRE work from other contexts. Thus, projects in pre-K-12 schools will be considered but emphasis will be on projects outside that context.

The NOFA Area: The funding focus for the 2016 funding cycle intends to support projects that advance the development, implementation, and /or assessment of conflict resolution education serving youth living in or attending school in structurally disadvantaged neighborhoods or communities.
For purposes of this NOFA structurally disadvantaged neighborhoods or communities may include social environments lacking in two or more of the following:
•    Access to sustained and sustaining employment,
•    Affordable, adequate, stable and safe housing,
•    Adequate healthcare
•    Access to affordable and nutritious food,
•    Access to affordable digital communication
•    Affordable and efficient transportation
•    Collective efficacy or ability to exert deliberative power in municipal decision-making. [1]

Conditions of structural disadvantage may correlate with policies and practices that lead to conflict around race, religion gender, sexual orientation, financial means, and immigration status.

Proposals may address the needs for culturally competent conflict resolution educational (CRE) programming in and for communities experiencing divergent outcomes in school discipline, disproportionate referrals to the juvenile/criminal justice systems, and heightened barriers to re-entry from those systems to schools and community. For example, projects could:

serve youth affected by:
·      Disparate impact from policing and school disciplinary practices in structurally disadvantaged communities
·      Unjust aggression based on race, religion, culture, or LGBTQ, immigration status, or economic status
·      Cultural conflict or isolation,
through programs teaching and using conflict resolutions processes incorporating
·      Restorative practices or
·      Community dialogue,
in order to
·      Increase awareness and empathy
·      Acknowledge and honor identity
·      Reconcile, restore and strengthen relationships
·      Fulfill individual and institutional capacity to contribute to the learning community.

Preference will be given to programs that exhibit the ability to be scalable or replicable on a national level.

Funding Parameters and Criteria for the 2016 Funding Cycle

·      The JAMS Foundation estimates awarding up to $100,000 in new awards for the 2016 funding cycle based on ACR review and recommendations. ACR will also monitor grant progress post-award.
·      Requests for funding can range from $15,000 to $50,000 per year of funding. In special circumstances projects requesting more than $50,000 per year may be considered. We are looking to recommend a small number of high quality projects with proven impact and the potential of regional and national impact upon completion.
·      The proposed projects can be one or two year projects, but decisions on funding for a second year will be contingent on evidence of benchmark accomplishments at the end of the first year of funding.
·      Preference for funding is given for Development and Innovation projects – bringing exciting new ideas to fruition. A secondary emphasis is on Expansion grants that enable an already developed pilot project to be taken to national rollout.
·      Eligible organizations include nonprofit 501(c)3 organizations, educational institutions, and public agencies.

RFP Project Process

·      Interested organizations or individuals are required to submit a 1-2 page Initial Project Idea description (using the guidelines on the following page) to ACR no later than midnight (EST) Monday, March 28th to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).
·      The ACR Grant review committee will notify applicants if they have been selected to develop a full proposal for submission and review by Friday, April 29th.
·      Full proposals (with a required application protocol provided upon notification) will be due to the ACR Grant review committee by Thursday, June 30th.
·      Funding decisions are anticipated at the August 2016 JAMS Foundation Board meeting.
·      It is anticipated that notifications of the final decision will be made in late August – early September and made public at ACR’s Annual Conference, September 28 – October 1 in Baltimore, MD.

Please address questions about grant program to the Co-Chairs of the JAMS/ACR Grant Steering Committee, Bryan Hanson at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or Dr. Phyllis Hildreth at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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Initial Proposal Ideas Description
Please submit an initial proposal idea description as a .pdf document of no more than 2 pages (single spaced, 12-point font, 1 inch margins). Please include the following information in your description.  Please note, incomplete submissions and those which do not adhere to the specifications will not be considered.
Applicant Information:
1.    Organization Name/Address
2.    Organizational Contact Person (and necessary contact information)
3.      Organizational Type (educational institution, LEA, HEI, NGO, etc.)
4.    Organization’s Previous Experience in Serving Special Needs Populations (only 1-2 paragraph)
5.    Organization’s Previous Work in Conflict Resolution Education (only 1-2 paragraphs)

Project Description:
In your 1-2 page description of the project please discuss the following:
1.    Describe the population to be served and your organization’s access to that population
2.    Describe the nature of the proposed project and the need for this project (what are the important benefits to be obtained if the project is funded)
3.    Describe the uniqueness of this project – to what extent is this groundbreaking or innovative work
4.    Describe your organization’s expertise and qualifications to do this work
5.    Discuss the key personnel in the project and their qualifications for involvement
6.    Indicate the general amount of funding requested for Year 1 (and for year 2 if relevant) and a general description of what that funding will be used for.
7.    Discuss additional sources of funding or in-kind support already obtained for this project or for foundational work in this area.
8.    Suggest how you would measure or assess the success or impact of this project if funded.

Please submit an e-copy .pdf document of the Initial Project Ideas Description no later than midnight (EST) Monday, March 28th to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Prior to submission, questions may be addressed to Bryan Hanson at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 402.280.3365 or Phyllis Hildreth at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or 615-966-6680.

JAMS_and_ACR_Grant_NOFA.pdf

Project Prevent Grant Program seeks to address trauma from exposure to pervasive violence

Posted by CR Ed on Jun 05, 14  

Recently the U.S. Department of Education announced a new grant competition called Project Prevent. Application deadline: June 30, 2014

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
This program provides funding to local educational agencies (LEAs) to increase their capacity both to identify, assess, and serve students exposed to pervasive violence, helping to ensure that affected students are offered mental health services for trauma or anxiety; support conflict resolution programs; and implement other school–based violence prevention strategies in order to reduce the likelihood that these students will later commit violent acts.

TYPES OF PROJECTS
These projects must offer students:  (1) access to school-based counseling services, or referrals to community-based counseling services, for assistance in coping with trauma or anxiety; (2) school-based social and emotional supports for students to help address the effects of violence; (3) conflict resolution and other school-based strategies to prevent future violence; and (4) a safer and improved school environment, which may include, among others, activities to decrease the incidence of harassment, bullying, violence, gang involvement, and substance use.  Applicants must address all four subparts of this absolute priority.

Project Period:  Up to 60 months
Estimated Available Funds:  $9,750,000
Estimated Range of Awards:  $250,000 to $1,000,000
Estimated Average Size of Awards: $487,500 (for each year of funding requested)
Estimated Number of Awards:  20

Details available at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/projectprevent/index.html

OJJDP To Host Restorative Justice Webinar

Posted by CR Ed on Jan 03, 12  

On January 26, 2012, at 2 p.m. E.T., the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) will host the Webinar, Bricks and Mortar of Restorative Justice: Build to Withstand the Winds of Change.

The Webinar presenters will help participants understand how communities can use restorative justice practices in place of court processing and punitive disciplinary approaches to address juvenile offending. It will also discuss the roles of the victim, offender, and community in the restorative process; describe how to design and implement restorative practices in a variety of juvenile justice settings; and explain how offenders in restorative justice programs learn to become accountable for their actions.

Registration is available online.

Thank a Teacher Day on Nov 25th - StoryCorps Listens to Teachers

Posted by CR Ed on Nov 16, 11  

The StoryCorps project is hosting a “Thank a Teacher” day on November 25th as part of the National Day of Listening.  StoryCorps hopes to get citizen-led interviews of teachers in every state in the United States. Seems like a great project for young journalists and researchers and an opportunity for administrators to appreciate some of the great teachers they know.

storycorpsmap.jpg width=349 height=314 hspace=40 vspace=10

U.S. Department of Education Invites Comments on School Bullying Law and Policy Plan

Posted by CR Ed on Jun 21, 11  

The U.S. Department of Education has published a plan to conduct case studies at 24 school sites across the nation to analyze bullying laws and policies.

The study will identify promising strategies and practices schools use to combat bullying and will examine how state legislative requirements influence policies, including ways that state and district policies facilitate or create challenges for effective implementation.

Comments are due by August 1, 2011, and may be submitted electronically to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or mailed to the U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, LBJ, Washington, DC 20202–4537.

Senate is Briefed on Social-Emotional Learning as a Tool for Academic Success

Posted by CR Ed on Jun 13, 11  

On May 12th a Senate briefing was held to inform members of the US Senate (as well as other policy influencers) on the issues of social, emotional and character development. The collaboration included members of The National Association of School Psychologists, The Committee for Children, The National School Climate Center and The Character Education Partnership. The briefing, entitled “Enhancing Conditions for Student Learning and Academic Achievement through Social, Emotional, and Character Development,” was led by Linda McKay, one of the Character Education Partnership’s Board of Director.

A helpful summary of the topics addressed is available on the School Climate Blog hosted by The National School Climate Center.

Pre-order 2011-2012 CRE Teacher Calendars

Posted by CR Ed on May 22, 11  

The 3rd Edition of our popular wall calendar for teachers and youth workers is being developed now. Promote conflict resolution skills in your learning communities with the full-color 28-page wall calendar covering the school year (August 2011 through July 2012). Each month includes a full page of activities and educator tips to promote conflict resolution. The calendar’s date grid highlights significant holidays, conflict resolution events and peacemaker birthdays. CREducation.org also provides a pdf smartboard-friendly version with live web-links leading to additional information, videos and learning modules.

CRE CALENDAR PRE-ORDER OPPORTUNITY
This announcement flyer serves as your chance to help support conflict resolution in education, gift others in your organization, and promote your own related initiatives. A business card sized space is provided on the back cover of the calendar so donors can paste or stamp a label promoting your organization. Resale of this non-profit calendar is not permitted. Delivery of the print calendars is scheduled for the last week of July.

The cost for advance orders of the 28-page full-color calendars is as follows if you can commit by June 30, 2011.
$2.00 each (on pre-orders of 25 or fewer calendars);
$1.75 each (on pre-orders of 26-100);
$1.50 each (on pre-orders of 100+)

To get a better feel for the product, you can take a look at last year’s calendar online here.

sample from last year

New Editors Selected for 3rd Edition CRE Activity Calendar

Posted by CR Ed on May 09, 11  

We are pleased to announce a new editorial team for the 3rd Edition of our popular Conflict Resolution Education Activity Calendar. Selected via a competitive application process, the 3rd Edition will be co-edited by Marina Piscolish (Hawaii, Mapping Change, LLC) and Kathy Wian (University of Delaware, Conflict Resolution Program) with support from Susan Young (Hawaii), Regina McCarthy (Pittsburgh, PA) and several others. The team will curate the content of the calendar, working with submissions from contributors (see submission form here) and newly developed content as needed. The theme for the 2011-2012 edition will include a focus on the relationship between conflict resolution practices and health and wellness.

Marina Piscolish was originally a secondary teacher of social studies, who later earned a doctorate in Education from University of Pittsburgh focused on critical democracy in school systems and in reform efforts. Upon moving to Delaware in 1993, she created the first CR Center at the University of Delaware, still in operation today. Originally called the Program on Conflict Resolution in Education, it later expanded to serve other sectors and dropped education from its title, while education remained a heavy focus of its work. Currently in private practice in Hawaii, Piscolish teaches Conflict Resolution for Educators at the University of Hawaii.

Kathy Wian is the Director of the Conflict Resolution Program (CRP) at the Institute for Public Administration at the University of Delaware. For the past 16 years, CRP has provided a variety of conflict resolution services to teachers, administrators, school boards, parents, advocates and students. They have conducted workshops focused on shared decision making, strategic change, peer mediation, conflict resolution, and collaborative meetings to name a few. CRP also manages Delaware’s statewide special education mediation program and the statewide IEP meeting facilitation program. More information on the Conflict Resolution Program that Wian directs is available online at http://www.ipa.udel.edu/crp/

Evidence-Based, Nonpunitive Alternatives To Zero Tolerance

Posted by CR Ed on Apr 21, 11  

A March 2011 research brief by Child Trends entitled “Multiple Responses, Promising Results: Evidence-Based, Nonpunitive Alternatives To Zero Tolerance,” suggests that zero tolerance school discipline policies have not been proven effective by research and may have negative effects, making students more likely to drop out and less likely to graduate on time. Instead, the brief recommends the use of nonpunitive disciplinary action, such as behavior interventions, social skills classes, and character education.

The brief is free and available online.